Right of Way

Polo is the fastest and oldest team sport in the world. If you know a lot about tactics and have a penchant for speed and risk, this is the game for you. Though money certainly helps as well.
Text Wiebke Brauer
Photo Veronika Faustmann

Let’s begin by clearing up a common misunderstanding: The polo shirt has absolutely nothing to do with the sport. The shirt was invented by French tennis player René Lacoste in 1933, but it wasn’t until 1972 that designer Ralph Lauren linked the shirt and the sport through an elaborate advertising campaign.
The “sport of kings” dates back more than 2,600 years to equestrian games played on large courts in ancient Persia. The British later discovered the game during their colonial rule of India and in 1859 founded the first polo club, the Cachar Club, in Silchar. Polo was an Olympic discipline five times (1900, 1908, 1920, 1924 and 1936), but failed to establish itself. To this day, the sport has thus remained in its niche, along with its attributes: It is an elitist sport, often maligned as a game for rich men on small horses. And it isn’t for the faint of heart. But despite it all – or perhaps even more so because of it – it is an absolutely fascinating sport.

The “sport of kings” dates back more than 2,600 years to equestrian games played on large courts in ancient Persia.

Polo is especially popular in Argentina. An English farmer introduced the sport to Buenos Aires in 1877, and the first polo club in the country was established in 1888. English riding culture and the horseback life of the Gauchos complemented each other perfectly, and today the best players and horses come from Argentina. At one time, South American Arabians and English Thoroughbreds were the most popular crosses; today breeding is perfected through cloning and embryo transfer.

1/5Muscle power counts for little in polo. Tactical finesse, reaction speed and a willingness to take risks are much more important. As is a festive mood. Polo is by no means strictly a man’s game. There is documented evidence of men and women playing together as far back as 16th and 17th century Persia.
2/5Muscle power counts for little in polo. Tactical finesse, reaction speed and a willingness to take risks are much more important. As is a festive mood. Polo is by no means strictly a man’s game. There is documented evidence of men and women playing together as far back as 16th and 17th century Persia.
3/5Muscle power counts for little in polo. Tactical finesse, reaction speed and a willingness to take risks are much more important. As is a festive mood. Polo is by no means strictly a man’s game. There is documented evidence of men and women playing together as far back as 16th and 17th century Persia.
4/5Muscle power counts for little in polo. Tactical finesse, reaction speed and a willingness to take risks are much more important. As is a festive mood. Polo is by no means strictly a man’s game. There is documented evidence of men and women playing together as far back as 16th and 17th century Persia.
5/5Muscle power counts for little in polo. Tactical finesse, reaction speed and a willingness to take risks are much more important. As is a festive mood. Polo is by no means strictly a man’s game. There is documented evidence of men and women playing together as far back as 16th and 17th century Persia.

But even the best horse is of no use without the right technique. The field is up to 270 meters long and 145 meters wide, a relatively large surface for just eight players. If the riders simply go galloping back and forth without a good strategy, their horses won’t last for long. Polo once was the preserve of wealthy families, but these days there are associations around the world working to open up the sport to all. If that really is necessary is another question. A world of small universes is also very appealing.

More pictures by Veronika Faustmann and information about polo can be found in the current rampstyle #23.

Available now!

mehr aus dieser ausgabe


ramp shop


Latest articles

ramp #55 - Say Watt?

Moin! We find joy. In the North Germans. They are generally regarded as cold and unapproachable. Exuberance is a foreign word to them. The greeting behavior contributes to the consolidation of the first impression, for the North Germans an implied nod is sufficient. Particularly good-humored specimens let themselves be carried away to a »Moin».

Express Yourself: Grason Ratowsky

Grason Ratowsky has worked as creative director for several agencies in New York and spent many years in product design. Today the thirty-six-year-old artist lives on Mallorca for most of the year. And paints. We wanted to know what role the subconscious plays in his work and whether an artist has to be unhappy in order to be successful. Although Ratowsky himself makes a very satisfied impression.

Time for luxury: Bulgari opens the Autostyle live Workshops

Following last week's kick-off, Autostyle 2021's first workshop is set for today: Fabrizio Buonamassa will guide visitors through the development of Bulgari's in-house luxury watches and the fusion of Italian design culture with Swiss watchmaking skills

Really Fast

This is a story full of ups and downs, starting with our author almost not being allowed into Italy to drive the Ferrari SF90 Stradale Assetto Fiorano. Which would have made for a lot of frustration and certainly a lot of noise on what is now an international day of screams of frustration. All went well, of course.